Category Archive Laptop Desktop Backup

Bytechnicalguy

Should You Backup Everything?

You would automatically think you should backup everything, but should you? Just as you should think and plan what it is you want to backup, you also need to give thought to what you don’t need to backup. Backing up what you don’t need wastes time and backup disk space on your backup server and won’t help you recover from a disaster. So what don’t you need? Read More

Bytechnicalguy

When Is The Best Time To Backup?

Let’s face it, we’re all busy, so when is the best time to backup?
We spend our days trying to fit in the important things, along with the urgent things, and it’s often tough to pick between the two. We know doing backups is important, but unless they are automated they are not urgent enough until it’s too late and data has been lost. Even with automation; when is the best time to backup your computer? Morning? Evening? Overnight?
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Bytechnicalguy

How To Avoid The Pain Of Computer Failure

I got a message last week from a contact in LinkedIn anxiously asking for help. Their laptop had died. Well, not just died, it burned! They sent me a picture. You can see the battery at the top that has melted, and the white stuff – well that’s Fire Extinguisher power or whatever else they threw on it to make the flames stop.
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Bytechnicalguy

Hard Drive Failure Can Be Planned For

internal-hard-driveUgh, a hard drive failure. The hard drive is still likely the most fragile component on a computer. Sure, they have got more robust over the years, and can survive more G-forces than they used to. But the problem is not really the hard drive itself, the problem is that people keep dropping their computers. Or, they get knocked onto the floor by associates, pets, or the laptop just gets generally abused over time. The result? A hard drive failure.
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Bytechnicalguy

My Laptop Recovery – After It Died Today

t440-laptopI did a laptop recovery this morning – because it was completely dead when I woke up this morning.
I had everything I needed to continue on in about two hours. Want to know how?
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Bytechnicalguy

Cloud Computing for Lawyers in BC

The Law Society of British Columbia has just come out and said that “BC lawyers are prohibited from using non-BC-based cloud computing providers, including Google and Dropbox.” according to the website Slaw. If this is indeed the case then CloudPockets can help in at least one area, maybe more. Read More

Bytechnicalguy

Incremental Backup Tape vs Cloud

One of the big advantages of cloud backup over traditional tape backup is the way incremental backups work.

What is Incremental?

An incremental backup means that after the initial backup, only the changes are backed up. This saves considerable backup time because backing up to tape was a slow process. Whereas a full backup of your systems may have required multiple tapes, and someone (or a multi-tape bay) to swap those tapes out when required, you could now perform a nightly backup to one tape. Much more efficient.
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Bytechnicalguy

Tomorrow’s The Big Day

blue-cloudWe’ve been gearing up and getting ready for the additional cloud service we’re opening up tomorrow – Web Hosting.

There’s a lot of behind the scenes work to be done to make sure everything happens seamlessly tomorrow. The existing web hosting customer’s websites won’t flicker, there will no interruption of service. The same goes for our Cloud Backup customers, since we’re using completely separate servers for these two services.

It’s been a few years since I’ve managed website hosting. I looked after a cluster of websites that processed money transactions a while back. I remember with my team at that time managing to fend of one of the largest denial of service attacks at the time – it took us two days. (I certainly hope not to go through that again)

The Cloud is where it’s at – and for Canadian businesses CloudPockets is the place!

Bytechnicalguy

It’s Incremental, My Dear Watson

Every Cloud backup you do with us is “incremental” – except for the very first one.

What is Incremental?

Courtesy binbert.comincremental cloud backupAn incremental backup is one that only backs up the changes that have occurred since the last backup. For example if you added a formula to your spreadsheet, only that formula gets added at the next backup, not the whole spreadsheet. Backups take much less time to complete when you are only backing up the changes, not the full files.

Incremental Tape Backups

Incremental backups when using tape technology had a good and bad side to it. It was fast when you backed up – but horribly slow if you had to recover, often requiring the swapping of multiple tapes in and out to finally get a full copy of your file. You put up with the pain of the restore because it hopefully happened much less that backups occurred.

Vs Cloud Backup

Cloud Backups work differently to tapes. The Delta technology used in our backup software is smart enough to combine all the available changes to your file when you restore it. This is all done transparently in the background. Now you have fast backups AND fast restores!

If you haven’t moved from using backup tapes to using the Cloud you need to consider incremental backup features as one of the benefits.

Bytechnicalguy

A Tale Of Two Backups

A Tale Of Two Backups

A cloud backup takes your critical data and saves it in a completely different physical location. It puts that copy far far away so that if something horrible happens to your office, building, or even your area, a cloud backup is available to restore and continue on.
But there are times that only a minor problem has occurred, maybe all you’ve done is accidentally deleted a file or folder – and you just need it back quickly. There’s the solution for that.

 

Make a local Backup

local-cloud-backup-driveCloudpockets Small Business cloud backup software has the ability to perform two types of backups; offsite (cloud) and onsite (local). These are two separate backup jobs and don’t necessarily have to include all the same files, however the onsite backup can be sent to an external USB drive or shared drive or folder that is onsite. The setup for each is almost exactly the same.

What’s the advantage?

In a word – speed. Recovering a file from your onsite backup will be faster than getting it from the cloud. If the disaster is just a few files, or a single computer that has died, then restoring from your onsite backup will get you back up and going quickly.
What this means then is that with Cloud Backup you can have the advantages of speed for quick local restores when you need them, and the security and protection of an offsite backup should the worst happen.

Try it. It’s the best of both backups!